"Beyond Privacy" ProjectCommunicationsLab NotesLiving between the linesNotes

“Beyond Privacy” Project: The Prologue (on the education that our kids deserve)

Provisional book cover: Title :

This post is about the “Beyond Privacy” Project: LIVING BETWEEN THE LINES information society through our personal information.

As this is an open work-in-progress book drafting project,

please do not hesitate to comment!

Every input is precious to help improve it.

Prologue

Life Lines

 

Let us imagine Sarah, a teenager who muses about how numerous information items link her to others. Shouldn’t we offer ourselves and our kids such an education?

 

My births

My foetal life was a pampered one. My mother closely watched over it. Both she and I enjoyed the support of caring relatives as well as of modern medicine. Thus long before my birth, my mother’s medical records already had stored up about me more than a hundred lines of text. Notes about observations, test results, diagnostic findings, prescriptions and medical procedures. Not to mention the thousands of lines of ultrasound images. Images of me which my Mom proudly displayed on her social networks’ pages. Sites that also displayed hundreds of lines of encouragements and advices from the people she meets there as well as from her obstetrician.

One échography, one relationships network: figure showing that fetus Sarah's echography links her to her mother, and the latter to her doctor and hospital on one side, and through social media, the mother to her family, friends, colleages and contacts

Barely out of the womb, the confirmation of my vital signs resulted in the opening of my very own medical record. I must admit that, for a time, it was identified by the bland first name of… “Baby”. Still, it was through the creation of this file that I finally became a “patient” in my own right, even after months of medical follow up.

My noisy and exhausting delivery was quickly followed by another birth. A more subtle but decisive one: that of a new citizen. It took place by writing of a few lines on a form for vital statistics registration. A seemingly minor gesture. But this act immediately made me the bearer of many legal rights and benefits – and later of obligations – among this society where accidents of history and genetics made me entered life.

And from “Baby”, I officially became “Sarah”.

(more…)

Field RemarksInformation & LawLab NotesLiving between the linesNotesObservationsReflections

Self-managing our digital identity, digital assets and intellectual property in case of death or incapacity

ObservationsNow a grandfather, I had to revise my will and mandate in case of incapacity. Except that this time, I found out that I must ask my potential agents and testamentary executors to deal with the ubiquity of digital media. That does complicate their task.

Only a few years ago, one could easily find the documents of an incapacitated or deceased person. It was enough to systematically round the various places where the person lived and worked. The nature of the documents generally jumped in the eyes: contracts, invoices, private correspondence, books, recordings, professional documents, etc. In the absence of specific instructions, one could apply certain customs: such as delivering private correspondence items to their authors, distribution of content libraries, records shelves, photo albums or collections to interested close ones; retention of fiscal documents for some six years before destroying them.

Digitalization of assets

As more and more people around me, I hold less and less documents on paper or other macroscopic media. Already, most of my documents are to be found in digital forms: private correspondence, files, invoices, contracts, tax documents, banking and accounting, books, music, photos, work documentation, etc. (more…)

CommunicationsInformation & LawLab NotesNotes

Lecture on the right to accessible information

INVITATION
Lecture
by Catherine Roy
Director General of the Centre de recherche et d’expérimentation sur l’inclusion numérique (Centre for research and experimentation in digital inclusion)
on

le droit à l’accessibilité des informations

(right of access to documents in media readable by everyone)
in the wake of the judgment in Donna Jodhan v. Attorney General of Canada

Lecture in French

A founding member of the HTML for all Working Group of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and as well as of W3Québec (an organization promoting open standards and best practices for the web and multimedia), Ms. Roy will address in particular the respective roles of legislation and of technical standards in the evolution of law, here in regard to the accessibility of information.

Monday, April 11, 2011 from 18:00 pm to 19:30 pm, Room A-1720, UQAM (Hubert-Aquin building on 400 Sainte-Catherine East street, metro Berri-UQAM) as part of an Information Law course (JUR5512).

Free admission (the number of places being limited, please RSVP by email: peladeau dot pierrot @t uqam dot ca)

Jodhan c. A. G. of Canada
The legal news in the heart of the conference is the recent decision of the Federal Court in November 2010, v. Donna Jodhan Attorney General ofCanada, as amended by decision of January 2011 (French version:http://decisions.fct-cf.gc.ca/fr/2010/2010cf1197/2010cf1197.html; English version: http:// decisions.fct-cf.gc.ca/en/2010/2010fc1197/2010fc1197.html). The main issue was whether the federal government had violated the right to equality guaranteed by the Canadian Charter, either by setting inadequate technical standards for Web accessibility to information, or by not implementing existing technical standards.

Information Law

This course acknowledges that much of the legal regulation of interpersonal relations mediated by information handlings flows from adhesion contracts, technical standards as well as rules and procedures incorporated into the informational devices themselves.

Living between the linesNotesObservations

Encrypted Https Google Search: Effective or Symbolic Measure?

Observations Google recently announced that it now offers the possibility to search for documents in a confidential manner through the secure encrypted internet exchanges protocol Internet Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). Concretely, this means that between your computer and Google’s servers, no one can read directly, nor your queries, nor the searches’ results (just like for your financial transactions are made confidential under SSL).

To benefit from this new “beta” service, one must go to https://www.google.com. Your browser should then indicate that the communication is secure (for example, by displaying a padlock). The localized sites of Google (such as google.fr or google.ca) do not offer this security, nor does this is available either for searching images and videos.

SSL Google Search

For sure, this is a significant symbolic gesture from the web giant. It has been applauded by the Center for Democracy & Technology as “a shining embodiment of the concept of Privacy by Design.”

For sure, the fact that a player as important as Google provides an increasing number of services under SSL (web access to Google Mail under SSL is already the default option since January 2010) could be a important signal to everyone on the Internet: it may be time to think about protecting a larger number of our Internet communications, even if it means slightly slower processing and transmission times (barely noticeable when one has computer and connections with some power).

However, is that new service actually changes anything to the experience of those whose exercise of their liberties or confidentiality of their work requires them to escape the surveillance of their employers, the Internet services providers (ISPs) or States? (more…)

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